Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: O:\dsplogo.JPGDescription: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: O:\dsplogo.JPG Ottawa Internationals Soccer Club-OISC

DSP-Developmental Soccer Program

 Weather Policy

(Updated Dec17th, 2012)

 

 

  

At practices, the coaches make the decision for the team though a parent has the right to take their child at any time. At a game, the referee calls the game and at a DSP Festival, only the Festival Convenor has the authority to delay or cancel the festival.

1) Lightning

Use the Flash to Bang method to monitor lightning for evacuation of the playing field to a safer environment. With this method the seconds are counted from the time a flash of lightning is seen until a clap of thunder is heard. When this number is 30 seconds or less, evacuation of the field should get under way. Lightning awareness should begin with the first flash of lightning seen or thunder clap heard.

Large enclosed structures (substantially constructed buildings) tend to be much safer than smaller or open structures. If the game is inside a stadium, encourage all players and coaches to go to the dressing rooms. If however, such a building is not available, fully enclosed vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, vans, fully enclosed farm vehicles, etc. with the windows rolled up provide good shelter from lightning. Never stand under trees, in an open field or under an umbrella.

The game should not be restarted until 30 minutes after the last clasp of thunder was heard or the last flash of lightning was seen.

2) Rain and Field Conditions

In the event of inclement weather, if the fields have standing water and would be damaged by playing or practice, the event should be cancelled. These are our fields and any damage to them will impact us directly.

3) Heat/Smog

A.  Avoid dehydration and make sure you pre-hydrate:

Don’t wait till you feel thirsty because the body will not be able to tell you in time that you are dehydrated. As a rule of thumb, keep hydrated. Here are some practical recommendations:

B. Evaluate Risk Factors:

The other issue that parents and coaches should consider are what are the risk factors which could predispose a soccer player to heat injury. Listed below are a the major risk factors but this is by no means an exhaustive list:

1.   Unacclimatized

2.   Unfit

3.   Use of a variety of medications

4.   Persons with persistent, disabling mental illness

5.   Certain medical conditions

The question is should my player or this team be playing in these circumstances?

C. Early Warning Signs:

How can you tell if one of your soccer players is experiencing heat injury? Below is a list of the early warning signs to look for and again this is not an exhaustive list:

1.   Hyperventilation

2.   Headache

3.   Dizziness

4.   Tingling arms

5.   Goose bumps (hair on arms standing on end)

6.   Chilliness

7.   Incoordination

8.   Confusion, agitation, uncooperativeness

D. For a DSP Festival

Festival Convenor:

1.  In the event of extreme heat (dictated by the DSP Festival convenor), water-breaks shall be instituted by the referee.  Details of the water-breaks are as follows:

Parents:

2.  If there is a dispute as to whether or not extreme heat is in place, coaches and the referee must discuss the circumstances and come to an arrangement upon which each party can agree.

a.   Since all children have different tolerances towards heat, parents have the right to withdraw their child at any time in the Festival.

b.   Soft-brimmed hats are allowed in the event of extreme heat.

c.   It is recommended that parents and coaches provide adequate water and try to keep players in shaded areas between games and while on the sidelines.